Two Western projects win Cornerstone Awards


Two projects in Western Canada won the Ecclesiastical Insurance Cornerstone Awards 2021. The National Trust of Canada Awards honor contributions to community, identity and a sense of belonging.

The Queen Elizabeth II Planetarium Restoration Project in Edmonton and The Shipyards in North Vancouver won the award in the Transformation Projects category which recognizes projects that have renewed or creatively transformed historic places or landscapes for new use. or traditional.

Queen Elizabeth II Planetarium

Located in Coronation Park, it is the first of its kind in Canada and an important historical landmark in Edmonton.

This transformative restoration is a tribute to the city’s commitment to conserving and adaptively reusing its historic resources, and an excellent example of strong collaboration with a community partner to ensure a sustainable project.

“We are delighted to provide exceptional work to Edmontonians and to ensure that the heritage and history of this facility lives on for the next generation,” said Darren Giacobbo, Project Manager, Facility Infrastructure Delivery. “This planetarium – once the first of its kind in Canada – has a rich heritage of star-gazing to Edmontonians, and we are proud that this restored space can continue to serve our communities.”

The restoration project for this 60 year old building included the restoration and refurbishment of the exterior and interior of a facility that has been out of service for over 30 years. It also featured modern upgrades such as LED lighting and new mechanical equipment to bring it into line with the City’s sustainability code and standards. The planetarium opened in the summer of 2021.

Shipyards

This redevelopment of a riverside site has retained its industrial character, balanced with the new functions of waterfront public facilities if necessary.

A reimagined machine shop, known as the “Shipyard Commons,” is central to the design, with a public skating plaza in the winter and a water park in the summer. The retractable roof on the west side mimics the character of structures familiar in the vernacular of the shipyard area. The second structure – housing a boutique hotel and a restaurant – adopts a contemporary form and acts as a foil to the heritage character of the machine shop.

Since opening in July 2019, it has grown into a thriving hub of activity, unifying a key part of the city’s once-disjointed waterfront and bringing to life a long-dormant industrial space.


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